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Posts Tagged ‘summer’

Longtime readers may remember that I restrain myself from eating fresh tomatoes out of season. Nothing compares to a homegrown summer tomato, in an heirloom variety that may not ship well but tastes delicious on your table. For those beauties, I like the simplest preparation, such as slices on my dinner plate with a little salt and pepper. If the tomatoes are really good, come morning I still want more. That’s when I make a fried egg and tomato sandwich, with or without (turkey Canadian) bacon. Butter some good bread and then toast it while you slice the tomatoes and lightly fry an egg. I like mine open-faced and over easy.

This is really my sandwich, straight out of the camera, no retouching or boosting the color.

That’s a classic brandywine tomato, by the way, plus a country egg, of course.  If you don’t like yours runny, break the yolk in the pan and cook it a bit more.  It’s tasty that way too!

What’s your favorite simple summer breakfast?

Copyright 2011 Ozarkhomesteader.

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Temperatures and humidity in Arkansas have dropped from deadly to merely oppressive, but we’re still running above normal.  Therefore, this weekend I made one of my favorite summer soups, gazpacho.  Gazpacho is a tomato soup made entirely of fresh and raw ingredients, and it refreshes and rejuvenates you as you eat it.  A friend once called it salsa soup, but it really is a bit more than that.  For our household, it’s so good we think of it as red gold on the table.  And except for the celery and seasonings, we grow everything that goes in it, and you can too.

copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader

Ingredients for 4-8 servings

Note:  Use what you have.  If 1 cucumber yields you 3/4 cup and you want to use it up, go for it.

  • 1 cup peeled, chopped tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup celery (about two stalks)
  • 1/2 cup cucumbers:  Peel if it’s one of those nasty store-bought cucumbers.  If it’s a larger cucumber, be sure to scoop out the bitter seed section.
  • 1/2 cup fresh pepper, either sweet bell pepper or a mild chile pepper (My usual choice is a Hatch/Anaheim.)
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed (as in, use a garlic press)
  • 3 tablespoons good red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil (optional)
  • 1/2 – 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce (or a dab of anchovies and 1 tablespoon of some good calamata or black olive juice)
  • 2 to 2 1/2 cups tomato juice
  • 1/3 cup snipped parsley or chervil or chiffonaded cilantro or lemon basil (one, not all four!), reserving some of the herb you select for garnish

You have three options for preparing this soup.

  • Option one is to mince finely all of your vegetables and then combine everything except the part of the herb you are reserving for garnish.
  • Option two is to dice your vegetables not so finely and then hit the combination of vegetables with everything else except 1 cup of the tomato juice with an immersion blender or put them in a food processor and pulse until they are minced.  Once the veggies are minced, you can add the rest of the tomato juice and the portion of the herb that isn’t garnish.
  • Option three is to put everything in your stand blender except the herbs and pulse until the veggies are minced.  Then add the herbs.

Chill the soup in a glass or stainless steel non-reactive container well before serving.  The soup keeps really well, the flavors melding nicely, and the mixture is so healthy that I often double the recipe to keep it on hand.

Do you have a favorite heat-beating recipe?

Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader, including photographs.

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Arkansas is back into the triple digits with summer heat, after a couple of days of reprieve.  At least it finally rained here, after all measurable rainfall detoured around the homestead from July 13 until yesterday.  Today we actually got close to half an inch of rain, if the gauge is correct.  That rain was followed by air so thick with moisture that it fogged up our windows from the outside.  It’s easy for me to long for cooler days.  But then I remember how long and dark winter was for us in early 2010.  It was cold.  The garden wouldn’t grow.  We got cabin fever.  Maybe I can deal with a few more triple-digit days if it means the days of summer can continue just a bit longer.

Which is your favorite season?

Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader.

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The heat finally broke here yesterday, and we’ll only see temperatures in the high 90s this week.  Only in the high 90s–I can’t believe I wrote that.  Given that we still don’t want to heat up the house any more than we have to, I’m going to talk ever so briefly today about how I bake and roast in the summer without baking and roasting us.  I use our convection toaster oven.  You can get a decent one as cheaply as $34 (yes, I priced one the other day just to be sure), and you can get fancier ones that will do a bit more for well under $100.  Actually, I use my toaster oven more than my regular oven all the time.  It takes less time to pre-heat and less energy to stay heated.  Most of the recipes you see on this site will fit in a decent-sized toaster.  If I’m making a pizza in the summer, I make sure it will fit in the toaster.  If I want muffins, I make a half dozen, so I can use the toaster.  Need cookies?  Use the toaster oven.

Now I’m going back to enjoying this beautiful morning, with temperatures around 73 degrees F.

Do you use your toaster oven a lot?  If so, what do you bake in it?

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Did your neighbor just surreptitiously drop a bag of zucchini on your doorstep and run?  Did you just uncover a zucchini club in your own garden that somehow escaped your notice for the past few days while it was growing into a gargantuan green nightmare?  Did your otherwise lovable CSA bury you in summer squash?  I have solutions, and they do not involve zucchini bread (which is good, but you can only eat so much).  Instead of lasagna noodles, how about using thinly sliced giant zucchini?  Instead of eggplant parmesan, how about using that same overgrown zucchini?  Are you trying to go low-carb?  Use larger (but not giant) zucchini to make ribbon strips of fettuccine!

To make zucchini lasagna, slice the zucchini fairly thinly across the club and fry in a shallow pan in just a little oil (as in a few squirts of spray oil), turning once as the zucchini browns.  Then layer marinara sauce (with or without meat) with the zucchini slices–evenly spaced across your baking pan and overlapped if necessary to get full coverage–and mozzarella and a thin grating of real parmesan cheese.  I’ll bet even the dedicated squash haters in your family will love it.  As one friend said to me years ago of a squash dish with cheese, “Well, of course I liked this squash.  You covered it in cheese!”

For zucchini parmesan, use thicker slices, and dredge the slices in egg and bread crumbs before frying if you want.  Layer as indicated for zucchini lasagna.  Add seasoned bread crumbs to the top if you did not bread the slices before frying.  It’s so easy!  Serve with a big salad and crusty bread.

For zucchini fettuccine, cut ribbons of zucchini using a vegetable peeler.  You can blanche the ribbons in salted boiling water for a minute or two before using or just toss with hot marinara or alfredo sauce.

Do not fear the giant zucchini!  It’s an opportunity.

Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader. All rights reserved.

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It’s hot, but my kitchen is not.  Dinner is cool.  Today’s dinner starts with gazpacho, a chilled tomato-vegetable soup, accompanied by shrimp salad in cucumber boats and beets.  I’ll post the gazpacho recipe separately.  Now I’ll share the shrimp boats basics.

Shrimp Boats

I like these shrimp boats because they are chocked full of raw vegetables, and the boat shape can lure in even picky eaters.  Serves two.

  • 1/4 onion, finely diced
  • 2 stalks celery, finely diced
  • optional:  fresh green peas or soybeans, if you have them
  • 1/2-3/4 pound shrimp (good sized), cleaned and boiled until just cooked
  • 1 heaping tablespoon mayonnaise
  • 1 squirt (about a teaspoon) ketchup (trust me!)
  • 2-4 tiny squirts Sriracha hot sauce
  • 1 large, long salad cucumber

Mix together the onion, celery, shrimp, mayo, ketchup, and hot sauce.  Add salt and pepper to taste.  Peel cucumber if the exterior is bitter or coated with nasty wax.  Cut the cucumber in half lengthwise to make two long halves.  Using a spoon, scoop out the seeds.  Now you’ve got a canoe!  Fill it with the shrimp salad mixture, and you’ve got a shrimp boat.

Shrimp Boats and Beets

Of course, you could substitute chicken salad, tuna salad, or salmon salad by adjusting your seasonings.  For an appetizer option or a whole fleet of smaller boats for dinner, use pickling cucumbers and salad-sized shrimp.

Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader.  Short excerpts and tweets are within fair use as long as you provide a full URL and attribution to Ozarkhomesteader.

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I can’t get enough of summer fruit.  Every day I gorge on melons and berries, knowing that their days in my farmers’ market and garden are limited.  It’s peaches, though, that not only make me know it’s summer but that also take me back to my roots.  There simply is nothing in the world like a ripe, fresh, juicy peach.  I eat a lot of them fresh, but it’s cobbler that makes me think of family.

Some day, I’ll part with my Georgia grandmother’s recipe for peach cobbler, which in fact is a deep-dish pie with a crunchy crust that you dish out with a big spoon.  Some day, I said.  Not today. Today I’ll give you the quicker, easier but still incredibly tasty version that I make for our smaller, slightly more health-conscious family.  We’re going to make it in a cast-iron skillet for ideal caramelization.  The topping, based on part of my grandmother’s cobbler pastry recipe, is amazingly simple (equal parts butter, sugar, and flour), and you will no doubt find its formula useful for sprinkling on muffins and coffee cake as well as cobblers.

For an 8-inch cast iron skillet you’ll need:

  • 4-5 ripe, large peaches
  • 2 tablespoons whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 2 tablespoons (or less) sugar
  • 1/3 cup cold butter
  • 1/3 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • pinch or 2 or 3 of nutmeg

For a 10-inch cast iron skillet (or deep pie pan) you’ll need:

  • 6-8 ripe, large peaches
  • 3 tablespoons whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 3 tablespoons (or less) sugar
  • 1/2 cup cold butter
  • 1/2 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • pinch or 2 or 3 of nutmeg

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.  Begin by peeling the peaches and removing the pits.  I do this by slicing the peaches in quarters first.  Then slice the peaches into 8 pieces each.  Toss with the first sugar and flour listed.  Put them in your cast iron skillet or pie pan after making sure that your baking vessel is well-buttered.

Next cut the chilled butter into the larger quantities of sugar and flour using a pastry cutter or just a fork.  Just be sure to keep the butter cold; we’re not making cookie dough, and the resulting mixture should retain discrete tiny pieces of butter encapsulated by flour and sugar.  Sprinkle in the nutmeg.  Crumble the butter mixture on top of the peaches and bake at 375 degrees F for 30-45 minutes, until the  peaches are bubbly and the top is golden brown and crusty.  Serve with a small scoop of real vanilla ice cream on top. Mmmmmmm.

Peach-Blueberry Cobbler

Peach-blueberry cobbler:  Add fresh or frozen blueberries on top of the peaches.

Peach-bramble cobbler:  Add blackberries on top of the peaches.  I think this is my favorite variation!

Blackberry cobbler:  You got it–go all blackberries.  Try a pinch of allspice in the blackberries or a splash of lime juice and/or zest.

Blueberry cobbler (for Leigh):  You may want a bottom pie crust for this variation.

Fall Variations:

Apple cobbler: Use apples (a bit more thinly sliced than the peaches) with cinnamon mixed in with the apples and cinnamon and a tiny pinch of allspice with the nutmeg in the topping.  You could also add cranberries for a really festive touch, but first chop them and toss them with more sugar, as they are very tart.

Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader.  Short excerpts with full URL and attribution to Ozarkhomesteader are welcome.  For all other uses, contact me.

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