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Archive for the ‘sausage’ Category

Here’s a quick treat to get you out of the kitchen fast with a warm meal for breakfast:  bake together eggs, cream (or milk), cooked sausage broken into bits, and fresh blueberries.

For each custard, place one serving of cooked breakfast sausage into a greased custard cup.  Then pour on one egg beaten with about a 1-2 tablespoons cream or milk, seasoned with a sprinkle of salt and fresh pepper.  Finally, toss in a handful of fresh blueberries.  Bake at 350 degrees F for about 20-30 minutes, or just until the custard is set.

You could also add a teaspoon of maple sugar to the custard, but why?  Instead, serve with a big bowl of fresh seasonal fruit.

Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader.  All rights reserved.

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For years we’ve understood that we need to eat several servings of fruits and vegetables every day, but I know that even with our attempts at healthy eating we don’t always hit the target number.  Breakfast is a great time to add more fruits and vegetables to your meal.  Today we enjoyed vegetable-filled migas with a side of local, organic strawberries and local, organic yogurt.  We’ve started the day a few servings of fruits and veggies ahead.

I first had migas on a trip to Texas a few years ago.  My understanding is that migas evolved first in Spain and then in the New World as a way to use up leftover bits–crumbs, as migas means in English.  Today we had migas with turkey sausage, although you certainly could make the dish vegetarian by leaving out the sausage.

Basic ingredients

  • finely sliced onion (I used leek because I had it on hand and because I like the milder flavor with eggs)
  • optional:  turkey sausage
  • sliced hot pepper (or sweet pepper if you have no tolerance for hot)
  • sliced or chopped tomato
  • optional:  baby summer squash, sliced and cut into chunks
  • fresh sage leaves, thinly sliced
  • oregano, thinly sliced
  • eggs, beaten with a splash of water
  • cheese to garnish
  • corn tortilla, cut into thin strips and then tossed with oil and baked until crispy (or fried)

sides:  salsa, tortillas for wrapping

Begin by  either toasting or frying the corn tortilla strips after tossing them with oil.  Set aside, out of the oil, until you finish the rest of the dish.  Saute the onion or leek and then brown the sausage, if you are using any.  Add in the sliced chiles, and after everything has cooked a few more minutes, add the herbs, squash, and tomatoes.  Last, pour on the eggs.  If your pan was hot to start and you are using heavy cast iron, you can probably turn it off now and count on residual heat to scramble the eggs.  Add salt and pepper to taste.Shred on a little cheese (cheddar, Monterrey jack) and spoon the migas onto serving plates.  Sprinkle with tortilla strips.  Serve with salsa and, if you want, tortillas for fork-free consumption.  Eat.  Enjoy.  

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Regular readers know I’m all about using what we grow here, in season.  Fortunately, some foods stay seasonal months after you’d think possible, such as the butternut squash that I picked in early November and kept in a cool room for winter, preserving it for our use last night.  For dinner we ate roasted  butternut squash, beets, onions, leeks, and shittake mushrooms served with Italian sausage and a sprinkling of goat cheese over a bed of whole-wheat fusilli pasta, cooked al dente.  The roasted butternut squash and goat cheese almost melted in the pasta to create a creamy, chunky, buttery sauce.  The beets provided glorious color and a caramelized sweetness.  Fresh herbs and Italian sausage rounded out the dish.   As always, we went organic with everything we could–in this case, everything.

Here’s what we used; you could change quantities to fit what you have on hand.

  • 2-3 large freshly dug beets, rough parts peeled off and quartered
  • 1 small butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and diced
  • 1-2 leek bottoms, cleaned (sliced lengthwise) and sliced across the grain
  • optional:  1  small, sweet onion, quartered and sliced (if you don’t have leeks)
  • 1 teaspoon or so finely chopped or dried Italian herbs (rosemary, oregano but probably not basil for this dish)
  • olive oil
  • butter
  • optional:  splash of balsamic vinegar
  • 1 cup or more of shittake mushroom tops, halved and then sliced  (other mushrooms will work too, but you may want to alter the roasting time)
  • 1/3 pound Italian sausage
  • 1 sweet or hot Italian pepper (ours came from our garden by way of the freezer), sliced
  • optional:  red pepper flakes
  • 3/4 – 1 dry cup whole-wheat fusilli pasta (or other hearty curly pasta that will retain its character in the face of other flavors)

Begin by preheating the oven to 375 degrees F.  (You could go to 400 degrees F, but only if you are using more, smaller beets, and then you’ll need to reduce total roast time to 20 minutes.)  Lightly coat the bottom of a heavy pan with olive oil and butter.  (I used cast iron–big surprise, right?)  Spread on your beets, squash, leeks and onions, toss them with the herbs, a little more olive oil, salt and pepper, and, if desired, the balsamic vinegar.  (You can also save this ingredient for later or leave it out altogether.)  Roast these vegetables for 20 minutes and then add the shittake mushrooms and roast for 10 more minutes.  Meanwhile, brown the Italian sausage and crumble or slice it and then keep it warm with the red pepper slices.  Pump up the heat with red pepper flakes if you want more spice.  As the sausage and peppers cook, prepare the pasta in boiling water.  Everything should be ready at about the same time–approximately 35 minutes after you started prepping the vegetables.  Put the drained fusilli in bowls and then add the sausage with peppers and the roasted vegetables, tossed with balsamic vinegar if you didn’t use it earlier.  Sprinkle the goat cheese on top.  As you eat, the goat cheese and butternut squash will start to meld with the pasta.

Vegetarian option:  substitute seasonal beans or seasoned garbanzo beans for the sausage!

Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader.  Short excerpts with full URL and attribution to Ozarkhomesteader are welcome. Please contact me for permission to use photographs.

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A few weeks ago, a reader asked me to post my whole-wheat pizza recipe.  Truth is, I don’t have a single recipe.  I have several. You see, we live where no pizza place will deliver, so if we want pizza, we have to make it. Today I’m going to share with you a recipe for a crisper-crust pizza. This will make a round about 13 inches.  I also ordinarily use my home-canned marinara sauce on my pizzas, but you’ll have to wait for summer to get that recipe, so I’m going to give you an alternative sauce.  This pizza has really traditional toppings, so it should have familiar tastes for a family that is transitioning to healthier, homemade food.  You can get all of the ingredients for this pizza as organic products or at least those produced without chemicals.

makes 8 generous slices

The Dough

  • 1 tablespoon yeast (less, like a teaspoon, if you have all day for the dough to rise–if you want pizza in an hour or two, use the full amount)
  • ½ cup warm water
  • 1 scant cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1 tablespoon wheat gluten
  • pinch of sugar
  • pinch of salt and/or Cavender’s Greek Seasoning

Put the water and yeast in a food processor.  Pulse to combine.  Add the flour and other dry ingredients.  Process just until the dough pulls into a ball.  You can easily make this dough without a food processor.  Just work in the flour with your hands and knead for about ten minutes. Put in a bowl coated with olive oil, turn dough over to coat with oil, and put in a warm place to rise.  When it’s doubled in size and an indentation you make with your finger  no longer refills quickly, it’s ready.

The Toppings

  • 1 small can tomato paste (you’ll have a few tablespoons left)
  • 1 tablespoon total dried oregano, rosemary, and thyme
  • 1 teaspoon crushed fennel seed
  • about 3 ounces fresh mozzarella cheese
  • 2 spicy Italian sausages (we use chicken), cooked whole and then thinly sliced
  • 8 large portobellini mushrooms, sliced and lightly sauteed in olive oil to release their liquid
  • 8 good pitted black olives, sliced in half
  • 1 ounce (about 1-inch cube) real parmesan cheese, grated finely

Heat the oven to 450 degrees, and put your pizza pan in the oven. (Yes, a pizza stone works really well for this recipe.  Unfortunately, my largest, narrow-rimmed cast iron fry pan is only 12 inches, so the dough would be thick on it.)  Punch down the dough and then gently work it to the 13-inch size on a bread board sprinkled with corn meal.  Now take the hot pizza stone out of the oven, sprinkle it with corn meal, and transfer the shaped dough to it.

Spread all but a couple of tablespoons of the tomato paste on the dough (lightly, not too much!) and sprinkle on the herbs and fennel seed. Cut the mozzarella in slices and place around the pizza evenly.

Now lay down  the sausage, followed by the mushrooms and olive halves. Now use a fine grater to cover everything with the parmesan cheese.If you use a really fine grater, a  single ounce of cheese goes a long, long way. Pop the pizza stone in the hot oven (450 degrees F) and bake for 10-12 minutes, more or less depending on the consistency of your oven.  When the pizza is getting brown on top, take it out. Let it sit a couple of minutes and then slice it.   Eat.  Enjoy.

Does this pizza look good to you?  Are you interested in more pizza recipes?  Try one of my deep-dish, whole-grain pizzas baked in a cast-iron skillet!

Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader.  Short excerpts and tweets with full URL and attribution to Ozarkhomesteader are welcome.  Please contact me for permission to use the photographs.

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Our winter garden has had a really challenging week, and it’s only getting worse.  I’ve taken all of the basic precautions, but when temperatures drop well below freezing and stay there for days, I know I’m going to lose some things.  The first thing I did was cut a whole bunch of kale and pull the most vulnerable leeks and made a Tuscan sausage, leek, and kale soup.  I also dug some baby turnips that were on the outer edge of the cold frame.  I’ll roast those later this week.  Where ice and snow have accumulated, I’ve left it on my cold frames and plastic coverings; the snow will be a better insulator than the glass and plastic alone.  Tomorrow I’ll pile pine straw and leaves around everything that I can, including my vegetable tunnels.  The good news is that, although some of what I’m growing will freeze, most of it will grow back, given a few weeks.  I’ll just have to be patient!

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Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader.  Posting of short excerpts 
with a full link is welcome.

I’m pledged on this blog to post recipes that are mostly created using local, seasonal ingredients. One of our new favorites among winter soups is Zuppa, an Italian soup from Tuscany that uses lots of kale, leeks, and Italian sausage.  I served it last night to my father, who thought kale was just a funny garnish.  He loved this soup!  Zuppa is a great way to introduce non-kale eaters to kale.

Here’s what you’ll need for 3 good servings:

  • 1-2  leek bottoms, cleaned and sliced across the grain (save the tops for a recipe where you’ll puree the soup)
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic, finely pressed or chopped
  • 2 large waxy potatoes, like Yukon gold or red potatoes  (I used one of each!)
  • optional:  1 carrot, finely diced
  • 3 spicy Italian sausages, cooked and sliced in half lengthwise and then in thin slices across the grain (I used organic chicken sausages)
  • optional:  red pepper, if you use sweet Italian sausage instead of spicy
  • rosemary sprig (or a few teaspoons of dried rosemary)–I removed the fresh rosemary spring after it flavored the soup
  • optional:  fresh or dried marjoram and/or oregano
  • about a quart of chicken or turkey stock
  • 1-2 quarts fresh kale leaves (measured before tough stems are removed–see below)
  • milk or cream to taste to fill out servings
  • salt and pepper to taste

I prepared this soup in a 2-quart, 8-inch wide cast iron Dutch oven.  The cast iron lets you cook the leeks and garlic at a very low setting without burning them, and then it lets you simmer for a while.  The 2-quart size is ideal for a family of 2-3 people.

Begin by cleaning the leek.  Slice off the root.  Slice off all about about an inch of the green part (the top). (Remember, they’ll go great in a pureed soup!) Slice the leeks lengthwise to clean, leafing through the layers to look for dirt.  Now slice the leek in thin slices across the grain.  Saute the leek slices in olive oil.  Now prep the garlic and add it too, being careful not to burn it.  Dice the potatoes and add them to the mix, stirring regularly.  Now start adding your stock.  Let the potatoes cook in the stock for about 20 minutes until they are soft.  Now add your sliced sausage.  Let the soup simmer while you prepare the kale. (If you wanted to start this soup well in advance, you could prepare it up to this point even the day before.)

Wash the kale thoroughly and remove any tough stems.  Now chop it fine.  When you do, you should notice the sweet aroma, like fresh-cut spring grass.  (My dad agrees that it smells like fresh-cut spring grass!) Kale is an absolutely amazing food, one of the healthiest ever.  One cup boiled, for example, contains 1327% of the USDA recommended daily value of Vitamin K, 192% of the RDV of Vitamin A, and 88% of the RDV of Vitamin C, all for just 36 calories!  Read more about kale’s health benefits here.

About 10-20 minutes before you are ready to serve the soup, add the chopped kale.  Let the soup simmer for 10-20 minutes until it is soft but still bright green.  Add about a cup of milk or cream.  Stir well, heat through, and serve with good, crusty bread, roasted winter squash, and a nice salad of winter greens!

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Copyright 2010 Ozarkhomesteader

On New Year’s Eve, I wanted something tasty to take to a party.  I was feeling traditional but wanted to use wholesome ingredients.  I decided to come up with an alternative to the old Bisquick sausage balls.  Unlike the Bisquick sausage balls, these have sufficient liquid to make permit the leavening agents to actually puff the the rest of the ingredients.  The eggs add an additional lightness.  The result is a light, fluffy, almost fritter-like barbeque sausage-cheddar bite!

  • 1 pound turkey sausage, uncooked
  • 1/2 pound, more or less, of good sharp cheddar cheese, grated
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4-1/3 cup good barbeque sauce (I used Annie’s smokey maple barbeque sauce)
  • 1-2 tablespoons buttermilk, kefir, or half milk, half yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon-1 tablespoon red chili
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder

Mix everything together thoroughly.  Let the mix rest for a few minutes so the flour and liquid can get to know each other.  Drop 1-inch balls onto lightly greased cookie sheets.  (I used a cookie scoop for this task.) Bake at 375 degrees F for about 20 minutes.  Mmmmmm.

*Do you really need to use Bisquick in the old sausage-ball recipe?  I’m pretty sure you don’t.  Bisquick is most flour with shortening and leavening (baking powder).  In the sausage-ball recipe, you don’t need the extra fat (shortening), and with minimal liquid, the leavening doesn’t do anything.  So was the sausage-ball recipe a vast Bisquick conspiracy, designed to get you to buy the box at least once a year?  You tell me!

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